634 West End Avenue, Suite 4, New York, NY 10024

(917) 533-8285 | looram@looram.com

THE LOORAM LEADERSHIP SERIES

We hold the coveted Government Services Agency Award (GS02F0003U) that permits all federal agencies to contract directly with Looram & Associates without seeking industry wide competitive bids. The program is tailored to fit the client’s needs.

IS SUPERVISION FOR ME? ®

THE PROGRAM

This one-day in-house seminar provides participants with the opportunity to learn more about supervision and whether they are suited for a supervisory position. In the morning we explore the roles and duties of supervisors to include interviews from supervisors that have been in the job for a year: likes, dislikes, surprises. We establish the organization's expectations and offer multiple avenues for developing supervisory skills. In the afternoon we provide a variety of assessment tools to assist participants in determining whether they are a good fit for the task. Perhaps most importantly we create an appreciation on the part of employees for how complex and demanding the task of supervision really is.

The presentation takes a neutral stance with regard to supervision. We neither encourage nor discourage participants from choosing supervision. Nonetheless, the information presented throughout the day has a dramatic influence on that decision. Participants provide a numerical rating describing their interest in supervision at the beginning of the seminar and again at the end. Typically over half the participants have either increased or decreased their interest in supervision by the end of the day. The seminar is important in both encouraging the right people to become supervisors and discouraging those who are not suited. Elements of the program include:

1) The distinct skill sets needed for supervision:

  • One-on-one relationship / leadership / communication skills needed to motivate individual employees.
  • Team building skills needed to build a well-coordinated team.
  • Mediation / communication skills needed to respond to both senior management and subordinate expectations.
  • Cooperation / coordination skills needed to be effective on your manager's team.
  • Networking skills needed to bring information and resources back to your team.
  • Time management, meeting management, goal setting and priority setting skills needed to make the maximum use of the resources of your team.

2) Survey and interview data from individuals who have completed their first year as a supervisor:

  • The rewards of supervision.
  • The challenges of supervision.
  • The surprises that they wish they had known about at the beginning.

3) Self assessment tools

  • Identification of each individual's needs, talents, and career anchors.

THE BENEFITS

The individual benefits since they are better able to make an informed decision regarding a supervisory path. Existing supervisors benefit as participants more fully appreciate the challenges and complexity of their role. Other employees benefit because those participants who move on to supervision have made an informed decision and are better prepared for the task. The organization benefits from a more informed professional management cadre. Instead of promoting personnel to a supervisory position, investing in their supervisory training only to find that they are not suited for supervision, or they do not want the challenge, this allows both the individual and the organization to make a more informed decision at the beginning of the process.

"Is Supervision For Me?" is a registered trademark.

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INDIVIDUAL LEADERSHIP

OVERVIEW

A leader must spend the time to become thoroughly acquainted with each individual's unique set of values, talents and needs. This is a reiterative process which builds a relationship with that person over time. The first part of this module provides participants with the soft skills to better understand each person as a unique entity. As this relationship develops so does the leaders ability to become more influential with this person. The second part of this module provides participants with specific hard leadership tools to maintain an effective dialogue, provide feedback, and select the leadership style appropriate for the individual and the task at hand. Key concepts in this module are described below.

MOTIVATING INDIVIDUALS

  • Value clarification: understanding own values and how they shape attitudes
  • Recognition of diverse values, attitudes and needs in the workplace
  • Identification of the need to draw on the unique talents of each individual
  • Acknowledging the diverse career needs found in the workplace
  • Meeting the leadership challenge of maintaining consistency and fairness while acknowledging the variety of motives found in the workplace.

MAINTAINING A DIALOGUE

  • The preconditions for dialogue
  • Active Listening: the ultimate leadership skill
  • Recognizing hidden assumptions
  • Finding the common ground

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE

  • Empathy: reading other people's emotions without their having to tell you what they are feeling.
  • Handling feelings in relationships with skill and harmony -- being able to articulate the unspoken pulse of an individual, a group and a situation and respond appropriately.
  • Knowing your feelings and using them to make life decisions you can live with.
  • Being able to manage your emotional life without being hijacked by it -- not being paralyzed by depression or worry, or swept away by anger.
  • Persisting in the face of setbacks and channeling your impulses in order to pursue your goals.

PROVIDING FEEDBACK

  • Elements of effective feedback
  • Understanding the need to address behaviors not perceived attitudes
  • Distinguishing between criticism and feedback

CONFLICT MANAGEMENT

  • Coping with difficult people
  • Conflict management styles
  • Getting to Yes
  • Traps and problems
  • Assertiveness vs. aggressiveness

DECISION MAKING / PROBLEM SOLVING

  • Problem solving models and when to use them
  • Determining who should be involved
  • Priority Setting
  • Decision making options
  • Criteria for selecting the appropriate decision option
  • Gaining commitment without consensus
  • Creating opportunities to adjust decisions based on new information

SELECTING A LEADERSHIP STYLE

  • Understanding and choosing the appropriate leadership style
  • Knowing when to shift styles
  • Understanding your own preferred leadership style

SPECIAL FEATURE

"Dialogue: Now You are Talking" A video program that teaches the principles of dialogue across culture, gender and age differences. Produced by Quality Media Resources, The Respectful Workplace Company

MEASUREMENT TOOLS APPLICABLE TO THIS INSTRUCTION

  • Hersey & Blanchard Situational Leadership
  • Rocheach Value Survey
  • Marcus Buckingham's Talent Inventory
  • Edgar Schein's Career Anchors
  • Thomas Kilman Conflict Styles Instrument

TEXTS FROM WHICH MATERIAL WILL BE DRAWN

  • Now, Discover Your Strengths, by Buckingham
  • The 8th Habit, by Steven Covey

AT THE COMPLETION OF THIS MODULE PARTICIPANTS WILL BE ABLE TO DEMONSTRATE THE FOLLOWING SKILLS

  • Shows respect and concern for people as individuals
  • Takes the time to understand the person in order to motivate them
  • Actively listens to what a person is saying: Is attentive to the words, the non-verbals and the emotional content of the message
  • Communicates ideas and expectations clearly
  • Provides sufficient recognition and rewards when performance is excellent
  • Provides timely and effective feedback when performance is poor
  • Encourages and accepts constructive criticism
  • Effectively assesses other's ability and willingness to perform tasks
  • Does not hesitate to provide clear direction and close supervision when needed
  • Provides coaching and assistance when needed
  • Is able to sell his / her ideas to others
  • Delegates decisions to others as appropriate

CONCLUSION

There is a soft and a hard side to leading individuals. Common to all cultures is the need to be recognized, heard and respected. I must know you, accept you and care about you before you will be willing to follow me. Then I must have the hard skills to communicate, provide feedback and choose an appropriate style of leadership.

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TEAM LEADERSHIP

OVERVIEW

This is the in-house version of our national public seminar sponsored by American Management Association that we have been delivering to attendees from Fortune 500 companies for fifteen years. It identifies processes that must in place for department teams to be effective. The seminar provides participants with the structure to create commonly understood and accepted procedures. And establishes clear expectations for individuals to be effective as team members. This is a highly interactive workshop in which participants are placed in teams and those teams are given tasks that elicit the team processes being discussed. Teams evaluate their own effectiveness and make appropriate corrections.

CREATING A TEAM CHARTER

  • Establishes the need for a written mutually agreed upon set of team processes.
  • Defines the elements of a team charter
  • Provides case study examples of a variety of team charters
  • Offers methods to evaluate and revise a team charter on an ongoing basis

COMMUNICATION

  • Establishes criteria for effective interpersonal and team communication, identifies the barriers to communication, and offers procedures to correct communication breakdowns.
  • Offers a menu of communication options available to teams.
  • Provides a method for teams to establish what has to be communicated, to whom, in what formats, with what frequency.

EXERCISING DECISION MAKING OPTIONS

  • Establishes criteria for healthy decision making on teams.
  • Provides a menu of consensus decision-making options available to teams, discusses the advantages of each.
  • Establishes a procedure for coming to consensus on the decision making process to be used prior to the discussion of the content.

DEFINING TEAM ROLES

  • Offers procedures for coming to an understanding of each team member's role on a team.
  • Establishes each individual's role in making decisions, and defines the actions that each team member is expected to take and the actions they are expected not to take.
  • Provides a method to establish very clear behavioral expectations of every team member
  • Establishes an equally agreed upon procedure to hold individual team members accountable to the team for the performance of those roles

TEAM MEMBER LEADERSHIP SKILLS

  • Leadership on high performing teams is shared.
  • It shifts depending upon the issue being addresses.
  • Leadership tends to go to those who meet the team's needs.
  • This instruction identifies the variety of behaviors that make for effective team leadership, and distinguishes leadership from dominance.

ADDITIONAL CONCEPTS THAT MAY BE INCLUDED IN THIS MODULE

When to use teams. Team size. Team membership. Self directed teams. Meeting management. Managing conflict among members. Inter-group conflict. Individual team member effectiveness.

SPECIAL FEATURE

At the completion of this module each participant is given individual feedback concerning his or her individual style as a team member.

MEASUREMENT TOOLS APPLICABLE TO THIS INSTRUCTION

  • Team Effectiveness: Task and Maintenance Styles, Bales
  • Kiersey Sorter: Problem Solving / Communication Styles

AT THE COMPLETION OF THIS MODULE PARTICIPANTS WILL BE ABLE TO DEMONSTRATE THE FOLLOWING SKILLS

  • Conducts meetings effectively
  • Makes timely individual decisions where appropriate and involves team members in the decision making process where appropriate
  • Insures team members understand their roles and responsibilities
  • Insures team efforts are properly coordinated
  • Encourages and open and candid discussion of critical areas affecting the team before making a decision
  • Builds commitment through participation
  • Insures that all views are heard and considered during team discussions
  • Copes effectively with disruptive team members
  • Knows when to lead. Follow, or get out of the way during group activities
  • Encourages a candid and open discussion of the group's process
  • Takes responsibility for decisions once they have been made

CONCLUSION

There are two critical aspects to leading teams. First the leader must put all the procedures in place to insure team members coordinate their actions smoothly and without friction. These procedures take the form of a written explicit mutually agreed upon team charter or by laws. Second the leader must have the requisite team communication skills, that are different from one on one skills and encourage the development of those skills in others.

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ORGANIZATION LEADERSHIP

OVERVIEW

At a certain point organizations “tip” into something else. They no longer behave like an organization “should”. Directives go ignored. Information becomes twisted. Technology gurus march to their own drummer. Different pockets of the organization have fundamentally different cultures and respond in some cases more readily to outside agencies than they do to their own chain of command. Powerful informal information networks are embedded throughout the system. Indeed at times it becomes unclear exactly where the boundaries of the organization are drawn or if there are any real boundaries at all. The “organization chart” is a lie. At best it tells you people’s phone numbers. No one is in charge. In fact the higher up you go in this complex system the less total control you have. You are not at the top. You are not at the bottom. You find yourself in the middle of a mess. Many of the leadership skills you have developed over the course of a career seem not to be as relevant in this environment.

Leadership in complexity does not come from the top. There is ample evidence that most large-scale change efforts initiated from the top do not succeed. People will block them, wait them out only to sabotage them later, or the culture itself will eventually kill them. It certainly does not come from the bottom.  Leadership comes from the muscle in the middle when those in the middle know how to flex those muscles. This module introduces participants to time tested tools to cut through this complexity. We address methods to develop a network of stakeholders located throughout the organization that provide you with an ongoing source of information and resources not obtainable within the chain of command. We provide method to identify and capitalize on the skunk works within that network. We describe and demonstrate the only way to articulate goals that have a chance of being accomplished in this kind of an environment and provide methods for recruiting the right mix of stakeholders and sponsors in support of those goals. Lastly we demonstrate how to wield the levers of organization culture to insure that the new behaviors are permanently embedded in and rewarded by the culture. This is not a theory class. This is a hands-on highly participative half-day seminar that delivers immediately usable skills.

ESTABLISHING A VISION

  • Identifies the key elements of an effective vision at any level
  • Provides examples of effective mid level visions that have led effective organization change efforts
  • Participants create visions for their own circle of influence and participants vote with their feet by joining those who have articulated a vision that has met the criteria described above

DEVELOPING THE NETWORK

  • Understand the importance of stakeholders: the higher one moves through an organizational structure the less total control one has. This explores the use of stakeholders within a structure to assist in the leadership process and enhance the ability to effectively manage change
  • Understand how to identify key stakeholders in an organization for a specific change effort
  • Understand the methods available communicate with and influence key stakeholders and stakeholder groups
  • Participants develop a recruiting plan for their vision based on the above principles

LEADING CHANGE

  • Identifies what needs to be communicated
  • Explores methods of communication
  • Establishes the importance of creating early successes
  • Coping with high level resistors

ASSESSING THE CULTURE

  • Identification of the key elements of organization culture
  • Identifying strengths and weakness of a particular culture, given the environment in which it operates
  • Identifying the cultural barriers to change
  • Developing an action plan for cultural change

SPECIAL FEATURE

This module begins with a very dynamic exercise that involves all participants and creates within a short period of time a dysfunctional organization: hierarchies, filtered communication, independent power bases, and a general breakdown in effectiveness. This exercise is designed to create an awareness of the problems inherent in any organizational structure and solutions to each problem. This is the same exercise, developed by Looram & Associates that has become part of the required course of instruction for all cadets at the United States Military Academy. Most of the instructional content of the course is related back to this opening exercise. In addition case studies from actual Looram & Associates clients will are used to demonstrate fundamental principles

MEASUREMENT TOOLS APPLICABLE TO THIS INSTRUCTION

Constructing an Organization Culture Profile by Cameron & Quinn

TEXTS FROM WHICH MATERIALS WILL BE DRAWN

  • Diagnosing and Changing Organization Culture by Cameron & Quinn
  • Leading Change by Kotter

AT THE COMPLETION OF THIS MODULE PARTICIPANTS WILL BE ABLE TO DEMONSTRATE THE FOLLOWING SKILLS

  • Identifies the elements of an effective vision and provides examples.
  • Effectively establishes and articulates a vision for his / her sphere of influence which focuses resources and energy
  • Leads with personal enthusiasm and commitment
  • Maintains the larger systemic view of a complex organization.
  • Understands how to obtain commitment from stakeholders in and outside the organization
  • Maintains sufficient flexibility and adaptability to shift priorities as appropriate
  • Actively takes steps to insure that the culture and climate of the organization remains healthy

CONCLUSION

Effective long-term change occurs when a small number of individuals develop a vision within their circle of influence: recruit the right stakeholders; manage the change process over time and address whatever cultural issues need to be changed. This module provides them with tools to initiate a change effort or participate in a team involved in a change effort.

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